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Here's How to Recreate the Smart-as-Hell Sampling from Kendrick's "LOYALTY."

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"Ugh, rappers just steal other people's songs! Why don't they learn to play some instruments?" So says your terrible rockist friend (and at this point, why are you still friends with them?). Never mind that most beats nowadays are original compositions by musicians with strong ears for melody, harmony, and rhythm, but the older art of sampling itself is loaded with hidden meaning and careful craft. Case in point: Kendrick Lamar's summer jam contender "LOYALTY."

The track's notable for many other reasons—among them being Rihanna's guest turn as a rapper, not a hook singer—but maybe most intriguing is the funhouse mirror flip of Bruno Mars' "24K Magic" by producers DJ Dahi, Sounwave, and Terrace Martin. The loop is so warped and diced that it's nigh-unrecognizable on first listen, but as this unofficial but educational video from a YouTube producer shows, it's not all that complicated, just very clever. Reversing the intro, then pitching it up a few semitones is a cinch, but it's the microhouse-styled chops that really impress. Unfortunately, if you're like me, you'll only be able to notice these tricks and not enjoy the flawless rapping happening on top. Such is the price of knowledge. Watch the video breakdown of Kendrick's "LOYALTY." below.

Phil is a Mac scrub so he's never used FL. He's on Twitter.



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nikolap
5 days ago
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Zagreb, Croatia
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German Black Metallers Farsot Go Dark on 'FAIL-LURE'

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German black metal crew Farsot have lain fairly dormant since the release of 2011's Insects (save for a 2016 four-way split), and their heavily melodic, even more heavily atmospheric take on the genre has been sorely missed. When I say that they're "atmospheric," I'm not implying that they've ingested one too many shoegaze records or grew up outside Portland; rather, the atmosphere Farsot conjures coats each note with an overwhelming sense of darkness, eldritch unease, and quiet malevolence (and then recorded it all in a earthen cave dug deep underground a primeval forest). It's very much a throwback to the Second Wave acts that undoubtedly continue to inspire them, in that they have no problem reconciling the melodic and epic with the raw and downright spooky,

FAIL·LURE is only the long-running Thuringian quintet's third full-length since their inception in 1999, and also marks their Prophecy Productions debut. The band's proggy impulses are on full display, but this is most certainly still a black metal record—it just happens to be one that keeps you guessing a bit without succumbing to full-bore wackiness.

The band sent Noisey a statement, which read: "More towards the origins [of] Farsot. Create our very own mood between rough and rugged black metal temper of the early Nineties connected with an exploration of the infinite width of music itself. The approach is more spontaneous and intuitive, consciously refraining from "heady" leanings and patterns. This makes the songs appear even more compact and dynamic than ever before. Lyric-wise, FAIL·LURE addresses the inevitable dilemma between fascination and mania, desire and disgust, power and weakness – the seeming rift between the sexes. It is an allegory of life as a not endless game that cannot be won. This multi-layered concept is reflected musically on the album. The ambiance extends from the deepest depths to the highest heights without losing the relation to its uniformity. Get carried away..."

Listen to FAIL·LURE in its moody, spiraling entirety below, and keep your eyes peeled for an April 21 release via Prophecy Productions. 

Kim Kelly is going dark on Twitter.



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nikolap
11 days ago
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Zagreb, Croatia
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Here's How You Can Protect Your Hearing at Shows and Not Be a Dumbass

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Most of us don't wear earplugs to concerts, and we probably won't end up being plagued by hearing problems. But based on the statistics behind noise-induced hearing loss and the sheer loudness of a typical concert, it's clear how much a risk you're taking when you go to a show unprotected. After all, the most common cause of hearing loss is loud noise. For some people, the reality of that risk has serious consequences. Joey Belanger, a 25-year-old living in Vancouver, is one such example. Since he was 18 or 19, he's had a constant ringing in his ears and has trouble hearing people when they aren't facing him. He blames it on being exposed to lots of loud music during concerts and while playing in bands as a teenager. Now, doing either of those is out of the question.

"I can't go to concerts anymore," says Belanger, "and if I go to the movie theatre my ears ring louder after so I usually try to avoid there and just watch movies at home."

You don't have to look hard to find forums filled with people lamenting their hearing loss or tinnitus after years of going to concerts without wearing earplugs. It's an understandable oversight; you're excited about the show and you're not really thinking about it, or you had brought some, but either lost or forgot them at home. And sure, it's loud, but it's not usually painfully loud, is it?

"Wouldn't it be great if when you damaged your hearing, blood gushed out of your ears?" asks Dr. Marshall Chasin, a Toronto audiologist and author of Hear the Music: Hearing Loss Prevention for Musicians. "It would be so obvious," he says. "But because hearing loss from loud music is so gradual and invisible, it's hard to educate people."

Concerts typically reach between 100 and 120 decibels. At 110 decibels, hearing damage can happen after only two minutes of exposure. One study found that only 8 percent of people who wore earplugs during exposure to that decibel level experienced hearing loss, compared with nearly half of those percent of those in the unprotected group. Dr. Chasin explains that while hearing loss may not be noticeable until you reach your 40s or 50s, tinnitus can start very early and get worse. (Here's just one example of what tinnitus sounds like, if you're curious.)



Bradley Waitman, a 19-year-old from Wasilla, Alaska, has tinnitus; he rarely went to concerts because of where he lives; in his case, he blames loud music through earphones several hours a day. Experts say millennials are at an increased risk for hearing loss and tinnitus already because of an increased exposure to "recreational noise" like concerts and nightclubs, and because of how much time we spend listening to music using earbuds.

"When I first noticed it, I became extremely angry at myself for being irresponsible and irreversibly hurting myself and became very reclusive. I couldn't come to terms with the reality that I will probably never experience silence or listen to music without worrying again," says Waitman. "I listen to music far, far less. I refuse to use headphones or go to shows because I'm too paranoid my condition will worsen and become disruptive again. Music is much less enjoyable now. It's never relaxing because of the underlying paranoia that I'll damage my ears again, and it reminds me that my ears will never be the same again."

More and more venues are now offering free or cheap earplugs, which ought to make hearing protection a more visible and convenient part of the concert experience and act as a helpful reminder to people who showed up without them. The kind of earplugs venues offer are generally the foam kind, which sound similar to sticking your fingers in your ears—that is, they block out mostly treble and make the music sound all muddled—but they're much safer than nothing. If you're a frequent concertgoer, or just care about hearing a live performance the way it's meant to be heard, there are lots of affordable options for earplugs that are designed to preserve sound fidelity while lowering loudness. Here are a few options: ER-20XS, DUBS, Earasers, V-MODA Faders VIP, and LiveMus!c HearSafe.

If you're really dedicated and have the money, you can also consider visiting an audiologist to get custom-made earplugs designed specifically for your ears.

"This is certainly something to be concerned about but I wouldn't go overboard; we don't have a generation or two of deafened music listeners out there, just a slightly greater-than-normal number," says Dr. Chasin. "I think that it's just habit. If people get in the habit of taking a few minutes to grab some earplugs — any earplugs — before going to the concert and throwing them in your pocket or purse, then things will be better."

Adam Feibel is a writer based in . Follow him on Twitter.



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nikolap
11 days ago
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Zagreb, Croatia
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Ulver - The Assassination Of Julius Caesar

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nikolap
12 days ago
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Zagreb, Croatia
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BBC documentary on LSD microdosing

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BBC News has a 15 minute documentary about people who take regular tiny doses of psychedelics drugs to deal with mental health issues, improve productivity, or just better appreciate what life has to offer.

From YouTube description:

Microdosing is when you take a tiny amount of psychedelic drugs - LSD or magic mushrooms usually - as part of your ordinary day. The drugs are illegal, and there is no medical evidence to say what the benefits or harms of it may be. But a small community of people in the UK are doing it anyway, and say it’s improving their lives. Some say it aids creativity and concentration and others argue it helps with their mental health problems. BBC Reporter Catrin Nye has been meeting the people that do it.

Here's my interview with Ayelet Waldman, who microdosed for a month and wrote a book about it called A Really Good Day.

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nikolap
12 days ago
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Zagreb, Croatia
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The linguistic backflips used by Deliveroo to pretend its employees are independent contractors

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Deliveroo is a "gig economy" company that hires people to cycle around big cities, delivering meals, while pretending that all their riders are actually "independent contractors" running their own businesses through which they subcontract to Deliveroo, thus dodging any need to pay benefits or comply with basic labor, health and safety rules. (more…)

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nikolap
20 days ago
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Zagreb, Croatia
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